Financial Reform Package Changes Mark-to-Market Rule

Posted on 11.11.10

*Due to constantly changing regulations, please consult your tax and accounting professional for the most up to date information on this and any topic that you research online.

The “Restoring American Financial Stability Act of 2010” was signed into law on July, 21, 2010. This landmark financial reform package contained a tax provision broadening the list of contracts that are excepted from mark-to-market treatment. Taxpayers must report gains and losses from regulated futures contracts and other “Section 1256 contracts” on an annual basis under the “mark-to-market” rule. The term Section 1256 contract means: regulated futures contracts, foreign currency contracts, nonequity options, dealer equity options, and dealer securities futures contracts. It does not include any securities futures contract or option on such a contract unless the contract or option is a dealer securities futures contract. Under the new law, for tax years beginning after July 21, 2010, all of the following also are excepted from the definition of a Section 1256 contract: any interest rate swap; currency swap, basis swap, interest rate cap, interest rate floor, commodity swap, equity swap, equity index swap, credit default swap, or similar agreement.

Source: RIA